Facts of Brain Tumor

brain-tumor-facts

Brain cancer

  • Brain tumors can be either dangerous (contain cancer cells) or amiable (don’t contain cancer cells). An essential brain tumor is a tumor which starts in the mind. On the off chance that a cancerous tumor which begins somewhere else in the body sends cells which wind up developing in the cerebrum, such tumors are then called auxiliary or metastatic brain tumors. This discussion is focused on primary brain tumors.
  • Age is not the factor of Brain tumors. It can occur at any age.
  • The symptoms of brain tumors vary according to the brain size, type, and location.
  • The most widely recognized indications of brain tumors incorporate migraines; deadness or shivering in the arms or legs; seizures, memory issues; state of mind and identity changes; adjust and strolling issues; queasiness and retching; changes in discourse, vision, or hearing.
  • Physicians group brain tumors by grade (the way the cells look under a microscope). The higher the grade number, the more abnormal the cells appear and the more aggressively the tumor usually behaves.
  • Brain tumors are classified as grade I, grade II, or grade III, or grade IV
  • The most common type of primary brain tumors among adults are astrocytoma, meningioma, and oligodendroglioma.
  • The most common type of primary brain tumors in children are medulloblastoma, grade I or II astrocytoma, (or glioma) ependymoma, and brain stem glioma.
  • Studies have found risk factors for brain tumors to include ionizing radiation from high dose X-rays (for example, radiation therapy where the machine is aimed at the head), and family history.
  • Brain tumors are diagnosed by the doctor based on the results of a medical history and physical examination and results of a variety of specialized tests of the brain and nervous system.
  • Treatment of a brain tumor depends on the type, location, and size of the tumor, as well as the age and health of the patient.